Retraining the Brain to Heal The Body

For The Opiate Crisis

5 to 8 million Americans use opioids for long-term management of chronic pain1

2.1 million people in the US are addicted to prescription opiates2

up to 60% of people with opioid addiction report chronic pain3

4 out of 5 current heroin users report their drug use began with prescription opiate pain relievers4

patients with chronic pain undergoing chronic opioid therapy reported higher pain levels than those not taking opioids3

Yet, According to the NIH Pathways to Prevention Workshop: The Role of Opioids in the Treatment of Chronic Pain Report:

Despite what is commonly done in current clinical practice, there appear to be few data to support the long-term use of opioids for chronic pain management.

Together, the prevalence of chronic pain and the increasing use of opioids have created a “silent epidemic” of distress, disability, and danger to a large percentage of Americans.

A root cause of the opioid crisis is that our nation has a pain crisis, with no solution in sight.

Most people with chronic pain are not drug seekers but relief seekers. -Alba Rodriguez, PhD

SFTi provides a safe, effective, scalable way to dramatically impact pain. Ten years of research with thousands of participants demonstrates resolution/reduction of 40%/80% of pain conditions. Impacting the pain crisis will serve to prevent and reverse opiate addiction, while reducing the fiscal deficit related to healthcare costs.

NIH Pathways to Prevention Workshop: The Role of Opioids in the Treatment of Chronic Pain, 2014

2 Results of 2012 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH)

3 Pain Medicine News, 2015

Annual Review of Public Health, 2015